All talks » Windows in Heaven


19 May 2019
2 Kings 6:24-8:6
Andrew Sach

Windows in Heaven

2 Kings 6:24-8:6

_____________________________

 

 

It’s a terrible thing to be hope-less…

Israel faces a terrible siege (6:24-31)

The boot is now on the other foot
(compare Israel’s siege against Moab in 2 Kings 3:26-27)

There is the bitterest echo of the glory days
(compare Solomon’s happy resolution of a dispute between two mothers in 1 Kings 3:16-28)

… especially when you are sure that God himself is against you...

“They shall besiege you in all your towns, until your high and fortified walls, in which you trusted, come down throughout all your land. And they shall besiege you in all your towns throughout all your land, which the LORD your God has given you.And you shall eat the fruit of your womb, the flesh of your sons and daughters, whom the LORD your God has given you, in the siege and in the distress with which your enemies shall distress you.” (Deuteronomy 28:52-53)

so what’s the point of turning to God?

“This trouble is from the LORD! Why should I wait for the LORD any longer?” (6v33)

 

 

 

But there is a Saviour who speaks a word of hope, even to the dead!

Elisha, though he’s the assassin, has done a lot of saving people

Salvation, by military victory,
for the whole nation (3:1-27)

Salvation for a faithful remnant,
the ‘sons of the prophets’ (4:1-44)

Salvation for a Gentile (5:1-27)

Salvation for a faithful remnant,
the ‘sons of the prophets’ (6:1-7)

Salvation, by military victory,
for the whole nation (6:8–7:20)

And he speaks a word of hope (7:1)

And he’s the one who can raise the dead
(8:1-6)

Elisha Jesus!

Embrace this hope! Do not reject it!

The promise comes true, exactly (7:16)

But the unbeliever misses out on the blessing (7:17)

 

  APPLICATION
(and Coffee Questions)

  

  How do we respond to hardship in general, or God’s discipline? Do you recognise the king’s response of spiritual apathy?

  What difference does it make to have a word of hope spoken by a resurrected Saviour? How should that change the way we respond to God’s discipline?